Search found 175 matches

by wjserson
Thu Jun 01, 2006 1:04 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: What do you call those shirts that let you see your navel?
Replies: 6
Views: 1125

"Crop top" is by far what I hear the most.
by wjserson
Wed May 17, 2006 5:44 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Words genuinely believed to be English.
Replies: 28
Views: 3314

I've heard French babyboomers say "Les Stones Rolling" more often myself.
by wjserson
Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:33 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: can Italian students learn faster than Chinese students?
Replies: 13
Views: 2454

Food for thought here: Through my Masters, I had to research the effects of French in Morocco, Spain, Italy and Vietnam. This also included studying the phonetic and syntaxic problems associated with teaching French in these 4 countries. What I found in these texts was that because Arabic (both Clas...
by wjserson
Wed Oct 19, 2005 8:12 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Double-bacon geniusburgers compile list of Simpsonisms
Replies: 3
Views: 926

Double-bacon geniusburgers compile list of Simpsonisms

An article in the Ottawa Citizen (with the above title) states that an online list of 'parlance' is making a list of phrases made popular by the hit show the Simpsons. It was not put together by lexicographers, but by fans of the show: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Made-up_words_in_The_Simpsons Did y...
by wjserson
Mon Sep 19, 2005 5:50 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Lessening prices?
Replies: 28
Views: 2873

I personally think that one of Juan's points is a key point that illustrates my opinion as well: "Allowing odd though not wrong expressions from students is not lowering standards." We might not have a language dictator who's responsible for accepting/rejecting new phrases, but I'd guess (from other...
by wjserson
Wed Sep 14, 2005 1:20 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Normality vs Normalcy
Replies: 5
Views: 1085

Well, in my opinion, social and societal differ in their application (and precise definition): social seems to be used for both individuals and society as a whole, wheras societal seems to be used for the latter. You wouldn't often hear "He had societal problems growing up". The educate vs educative...
by wjserson
Tue Sep 13, 2005 3:15 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Lessening prices?
Replies: 28
Views: 2873

On my first search in an online dictionary I found that the word "lessening" had an entry and gave contexts including an example with "prices" (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/lessening). I would side with Larry, personally. Subjective arguments like "255 online uses don't make it good English" dep...
by wjserson
Fri Sep 02, 2005 2:45 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: What's it called?
Replies: 13
Views: 1214

Sorry Meta, you were right. My bad.
by wjserson
Fri Sep 02, 2005 12:48 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: What's it called?
Replies: 13
Views: 1214

Just so everybody knows, I was helping Sally identify what she had in mind. I really don't know what the phenomenon is called that Juan mentioned. Juan's example demonstrates exactly what la liaison does in French. But Meta's example isn't quite right because the 't' in 'est' is followed by a conson...
by wjserson
Thu Sep 01, 2005 1:23 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: What's it called?
Replies: 13
Views: 1214

Hey Sally,

In French it's called "la liaison", in case you were wondering. My French-English dictionary says its the same in English.
by wjserson
Thu Aug 18, 2005 1:50 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Redundant? "Schmundant!"
Replies: 12
Views: 1725

That sure was indeed a hypercorrection SJ : I'm wrong because I wasn't talking about oral French? :) I may have only mentioned written French but it's hardly "wrong" because of that. The precise example I gave represents a difficulty (albeit, in written French only, if you have to hear it SJ) that b...
by wjserson
Wed Aug 17, 2005 3:55 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Redundant? "Schmundant!"
Replies: 12
Views: 1725

Seeing as the example I gave was written, SJ, the context for everything I said about native speakers was regarding the written French (I'd say native writers, but there really is no such thing) And I can say with absolute certainty that the writing example of redundancy I gave is indeed a problem f...
by wjserson
Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:43 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Redundant? "Schmundant!"
Replies: 12
Views: 1725

Stop me if I'm not following this discussion and I'm going in the wrong direction, and I realize I'm more information than necessary here :) When discussing language, I find identifying redundancy is a necessary topic (that comes up repeatedly) because we constantly want to understand why our langua...
by wjserson
Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:20 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: (the) last Thursday
Replies: 4
Views: 758

Just an observation: Some people treat days of the week as personal pronouns. Just as you wouldn't say " The Tara B is correct" , I find many native speakers wouldn't say "the last Thursday" when meaning "the previous Thursday". And although I'm probably wrong, Hey's theory regarding "last" with no ...
by wjserson
Tue Aug 16, 2005 3:00 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Slang in movies - help!
Replies: 1
Views: 453

Just to clarify what it is your researching: Do you mean your doing research on the represntation of slang used by characters in movies? If so, I wouldn't think you'd find anything that specific because the language used by these people is supposed to represent reality (and there are many books on s...