Search found 1421 matches

by Stephen Jones
Sun Oct 17, 2010 5:59 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Use of "wish"
Replies: 2
Views: 1256

yes
by Stephen Jones
Tue Oct 05, 2010 8:08 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: How to use " 's " as the contraction for " is
Replies: 4
Views: 1573

You can only use it when it's unstressed, which means it isn't at the end of the phrase.
by Stephen Jones
Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:47 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Verbs that are both action and state in p perfect continuous
Replies: 3
Views: 1395

Most state verbs can be used in the continuous: 'I'm thinking about it.' 'I'm loving it.' The continuous aspect emphasizes the fact that something is happening in a particular period of time and thus will have a beginning and an end. 'I'm hating this movie ' is putting emphasize on your feelings at ...
by Stephen Jones
Fri Sep 24, 2010 5:28 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Beginning sentence with "for"
Replies: 14
Views: 3995

To discover relative popularity in BrE and AmE you simply compare the Corpus of Contemporary American English with the British National Corpus. Do bear in mind that both cover different time periods, and that the registers used may differ in proportion, so for very recent phrases you may have to be ...
by Stephen Jones
Fri Sep 24, 2010 5:21 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: what's "it" in "it's raining"?
Replies: 20
Views: 7104

English is a language, unlike Spanish, where you can't miss out the subject. The technical term for whether you can miss out the subject is the 'null subject parameter'. The problem comes when there isn't a semantic subject. Nobody's doing the raining; so you use a dummy subject. The 'it' refers to ...
by Stephen Jones
Mon Sep 20, 2010 6:41 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Grammar question: Difference between "can" and &qu
Replies: 11
Views: 2659

The point about remoteness is not whether it is more easily understandable than less certain, but that it covers all the uses of the past tense in one concept.
by Stephen Jones
Fri Sep 17, 2010 6:07 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: “on / in / during” exams he just regurgitates everything
Replies: 11
Views: 2945

'In exams' has seven entries in the COCA, compared to 13 for 'during exams', so it's a perfectly viable alternative.

'on exams' is exceptionally common in American English, but rare in British English.
by Stephen Jones
Fri Sep 17, 2010 6:00 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Beginning sentence with "for"
Replies: 14
Views: 3995

I'd change the full stop for a semi-colon and keep the 'for', but that would mess up your sentence count.
by Stephen Jones
Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:58 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Grammar question: Difference between "can" and &qu
Replies: 11
Views: 2659

I would suggest that the remoteness here is one of interest in the venture; 'can' sounds more enthusiastic.

There are plenty of us around Larry who accept Lewis's basic premises. It is his more bizarre and convoluted explanations we balk at.
by Stephen Jones
Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:55 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Is use of the future continuous incorrect here ?
Replies: 15
Views: 3490

The continuous aspect emphasizes the time something is taking place in. There is no suggestion this is intended here, so I would dismiss the sentence as incorrect.
by Stephen Jones
Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:36 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Grammar question: using "can" or "could"
Replies: 20
Views: 4278

'faster than you could say' is keeping everything within the same hypothetical frame.

The difference in meaning is marginal.
by Stephen Jones
Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:41 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Comparatives and superlatives
Replies: 6
Views: 2591

Appears to be a British/American difference.

'much the most' is by far the most common in British English (32 to 1 in the BNC) whilst the proportion in the COCA is 14 to 832.
by Stephen Jones
Sun Apr 25, 2010 4:31 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: fanboys
Replies: 2
Views: 1214

The rule I heard was that you only put the comma in if there was a different subject.
I like coffee but (I) don't like tea.
I like coffee, but John likes tea.


I put a comma in if I feel a pause is appropriate, or if the sentence visually needs a break, but Americans generally don't like this idea.
by Stephen Jones
Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:57 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Was Berlitz the first school to use total immersion?
Replies: 12
Views: 4040

Yep. Their postillion got hit by lightning so they poured water all over him and he survived, but with foreign language syndrome.

But the practice started amongst evangelical Christians two thousand years ago who were immersed in the River Jordan and woke up speaking in tongues.
by Stephen Jones
Tue Apr 20, 2010 9:34 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: definite article - go to mosque / go to church
Replies: 3
Views: 3946

No reason why 'go to mosque' should be right.

'Go to church/hospital/university/prison' is correct. 'Go to mosque/petrol station/supermarket/ night club' is not.