Search found 3031 matches

by fluffyhamster
Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:16 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: quick grammar question: "It's more likely than not it w
Replies: 7
Views: 4939

Hi Larry, give Hong Kong my regards. :wink: Part of the reason I tend to give rather involved answers to apparently simple questions is that I'm not so much educating the OP (or myself!) as trying to anticipate the often conflicting demands of potentially quite querulous Asian teachers of English (w...
by fluffyhamster
Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:07 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: the be-all and end-all
Replies: 2
Views: 2684

I suspect that the most common form of the expression is simply that something isn't the be-all and end-all full stop (i.e. there might not need to be an 'of...life' tacked on at the end). Obviously the addition of 'my' serves to specify the speaker (should the context demand that). As for the choic...
by fluffyhamster
Fri Mar 08, 2013 11:52 pm
Forum: Assessment
Topic: Error Analysis
Replies: 1
Views: 2191

The first two terms appear to be synonymous (though coined by different people - Selinker versus Corder), while the third term seems much more general (e.g. 'slips or "performance errors" that even a native speaker may make when tired, or drunk, etc') and not specifically related to SLA. From what I...
by fluffyhamster
Fri Mar 08, 2013 9:39 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Syntax
Replies: 5
Views: 3074

Again, welcome. :wink: Bear in mind that the BNC describes British norms, which may not always be relevant in modern India!
by fluffyhamster
Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:22 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Syntax
Replies: 5
Views: 3074

You're very welcome, Kapvijay! To search for strings like prep + -ing + -en, use corpora that are tagged (~ with a tagset, for parts of speech), like the one here: http://corpus.byu.edu/bnc/ I've selected the search string you'll need, from the POS list. Just copy and paste the following string into...
by fluffyhamster
Wed Feb 27, 2013 9:10 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Syntax
Replies: 5
Views: 3074

Hi Kapvijay, and welcome to the AL forum! :wink: Here 'having' is verbal participle, isn't it?. So How does the preposition 'for' take verbal participle instead of noun? The most important thing is that at least it isn't ...for *have sent me the brochure LOL. That is, '-ing forms' (nice fuzzy indete...
by fluffyhamster
Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:14 pm
Forum: Bilingual Education
Topic: Best dictionaries for learners-opinions & REVIEWS
Replies: 31
Views: 41739

The more I've used it, the more I've become a great fan of the OALD's clear grammar codings and separation of words that can be more than one part of speech/word class into discreet sub-entries. The MED is also pretty good in this respect, in that it at least has boxes above the word explaining how ...
by fluffyhamster
Thu Feb 21, 2013 7:14 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: quick grammar question: "It's more likely than not it w
Replies: 7
Views: 4939

It's not so much a question of grammatical (in)correctness as a matter of chosen phrasing. Leaving aside the 'more...than not' for a second, if the speaker or writer starts with 'It's likely', they have committed themselves to an initial clause with a "dummy subject" (it) already. There are then sev...
by fluffyhamster
Tue Feb 12, 2013 4:14 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: I don't like basketball "and /or/ nor" football
Replies: 2
Views: 3543

2 certainly sounds the most natural; 3 is a bit formal~strange. 1 is just a proposition-combining~ellipting (I don't like basketball and [I don't like] basketball) and probably somewhat less usual way of expressing the meaning of 2, in which the 'or' isn't doing much other than simply combining the ...
by fluffyhamster
Wed Feb 06, 2013 11:51 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: final position consonants
Replies: 1
Views: 2673

Yes, there are. The following consonantal sounds do not occur at the end of English words: /h/, /w/, and /j/. Final /r/ meanwhile is usually silent in RP but pronounced in GenAm and other "r accents".

(Source: Collins COBUILD English Guides 8: Spelling).
by fluffyhamster
Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:42 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Standard orthogrphy vs phonetic alphabet.
Replies: 2
Views: 3459

As Sally says, you can transcribe any language regardless of its orthography if you use IPA (by which I mean a broad phonemic inventory drawn from the IPA) instead. IPA is also a good way of showing the pronunciation of words that may have a difficult or ambiguous pronunciation e.g. I read a book ev...
by fluffyhamster
Thu Dec 13, 2012 11:34 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: To be or not to be :)
Replies: 3
Views: 2427

Heh, you're welcome, Forgorin! :wink: I'm beginning to think there's only you and me left here...
by fluffyhamster
Sat Dec 01, 2012 7:08 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: To be or not to be :)
Replies: 3
Views: 2427

1: Let us do away with all ceremony (=Do away with all ceremony!) 2a: *Let all ceremony done away with. 2b: Let all ceremony be done away with. The word 'us' has disappeared, the past participle of do somehow appeared (which surely needs something, i.e. a form of be, in the chain before it to trigge...
by fluffyhamster
Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:27 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: For Fluffyhamster
Replies: 1
Views: 2097

In both sentences, the 'as to whether/if' part is a bit redundant, given the meaning of 'doubt', but once one has started down this wordier route then the '...if' phrasing does for whatever reason sound less smooth compared to the '...whether'. I wouldn't say either sentence is wrong, though, just t...
by fluffyhamster
Wed Sep 12, 2012 3:29 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Taking students from introduction to mastery of a new word
Replies: 5
Views: 3528

Hi Woody, long time no see. How's it hangin'? Maybe you could look back over the methods and materials used in Callum-style classes and give us a few examples of how words are introduced and then "built up" over time? Off the top of my head, how about something very high-frequency but ubertricky, li...