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Please help me out with this POEM.

 
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saifulazwan_19



Joined: 12 Aug 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 7:50 am    Post subject: Please help me out with this POEM. Reply with quote

(What exactly this following poem is all about?)


Tonight I Can Write (Pablo Neruda)

Tonight I can write the saddest lines.

Write, for example, 'The night is shattered
and the blue stars shiver in the distance.'

The night wind revolves in the sky and sings.

Tonight I can write the saddest lines.
I loved her, and sometimes she loved me too.

Through the nights like this one I held her in my arms.
I kissed her again and again under the endless sky.

She loved me, sometimes I loved her too.
How could one not have loved her great still eyes.

Tonight I can write the saddest lines.
To think that I do not have her. To feel that I have lost her.

To hear the immense night, still more immense without her.
And the verse falls to the soul like dew to the pasture.

What does it matter that my love could not keep her.
The night is shattered and she is not with me.

This is all. In the distance someone is singing. In the distance.
My soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.

My sight searches for her as though to go to her.
My heart looks for her, and she is not with me.

The same night whitening the same trees.
We, of that time, are no longer the same.

I no longer love her, that's certain, but how I loved her.
My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing.
Anotherís. She will be anotherís. Like my kisses before.
Her voice, her bright body. Her infinite eyes.

I no longer love her, thatís certain, but maybe I love her.
Love is so short, forgetting is so long.

Because through nights like this one I held her in my arms
my soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.

Though this be the last pain that she makes me suffer
and these the last verses that I write for her.
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Miz



Joined: 15 Sep 2003
Posts: 22
Location: Brazil

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, Pablo Neruda... Smile
It's the first time I read a poem of his translated into English. Well, interpreting poems is something very subjective, but I can try to help you by telling you my thoughts while reading this poem.

It seems to me that the lyrical self is going through a dŤja vu, 'cause he's witnessing events ("the same night whitening the same trees" / "through nights like this I held her in my arms") that are bringing up memories of similar nights when he had someone there with him, but not anymore, and he's allowing himself to suffer for this lack ("tonight i can write the saddest lines"). But, at the same time, although his "soul is not satisfied that it has lost her", he doesn't seem to have very strong feelings towards this woman anymore (I no longer love her, that's certain). Thus what he seems to miss is the moment itself, in which she was an important part of the whole. He misses what he used to feel ("how I loved her") and seems to be jealous that someone is gonna feel the same thing he did when he was with her ("another's, she will be another's"). So he secretly thinks that maybe he still loves her, but this was the one and only moment he'd allow himself to suffer for her.

beautiful poem...

regards,
Milena.
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mvr_moorthy



Joined: 02 Dec 2006
Posts: 4
Location: India

PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Though interpretation of poetry can be subjective, Pablo Neruda's poem has two dimensions; one half dealing with emotions and the other with the frailty of human emotions vis-ŗ-vis the social condition. The very title and the refrain "Tonight I can write the saddest lines" are immediately interlaced with examples which sound ironic, nothing more blatantly than lines 2 and 3:

"Write for example, 'the night is shattered
And the blue stars shiver in the distance."

Then with “I loved her, and sometimes she loved me too,” we enter the first phase of the poem where the poet juxtaposes what he knows for certain with a nagging element of doubt. The attempt to create a poetic mood is suddenly reversed with “She loved me, sometimes I loved her too.” This also indicates that Neruda is not writing a usual love poem, but all this is linked to physical attributes like her beautiful eyes and on his part only a weakness which is described just in one line. It also implies that the persona wishes to shut out past memory and live in the present.

“To think that I do not have her, to feel that I have lost her” where he is referring to either physical absence as a loss of love or a feeling that he has lost her to another rival, her dissatisfaction and rejection, and his inability and unwillingness to reconcile himself to those facts.

“It is another night, another song
My soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.”

And then the vain pursuit through memory lane begins. His emotional search finds that it is “the same night and the same trees”__ but both the lovers are changed. Then comes the new refrain rather a realization that “I no longer love her, that’s certain, but how I loved her.” Here the poem enters the second phase where the poet juxtaposes bare facts with lingering undercurrents of nostalgia. He finds it quite as charming but certainly less painful. Already he has outlived his anguish and is learning to live with life.

Once again with the reversal of this refrain the poem enters the final phase when he says:

“I no longer love her, that's certain, but maybe I love her.”
Here there is the dawning of a new meaning for ‘love’ and in the next line he sums up the whole experience:
“Love is so short, forgetting is so long”
The last four lines of the poem reflect the poet’s triumph over his own suffering ---- the origin of his love and the source of his despair. Yes. It is still painful; but what follows is the wisdom that is born out of that agony. He has seen the last of his agony, and can declare confidently:

“Tonight I can write the saddest lines.”

A great poem!

This reminds me of Dostoyevsky who once said “To write well one has to suffer and then overcome the suffering.” A true artistic process that is delectably presented by Pablo Neruda.



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ALTeacher



Joined: 28 Dec 2008
Posts: 1
Location: USA, currently

PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 10:45 pm    Post subject: wild guess? Reply with quote

I would say it's a Nightingale (or some bird) and the Moon.
The only time referred is night, when the moon would be out.
The singing is from birds, and the bird-author.
The "eyes" are the craters of the moon.
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