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Questions from Itasan
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eslweb



Joined: 31 May 2006
Posts: 208
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2006 8:56 am    Post subject: To know the language inside out... Reply with quote

Itasan,

1. know something backward
Can't be used because of subject verb agreement.
(Nice for something in English to follow the grammar rules for a change?)

2. know something backwards

This is not used as often as number 4, but can be used in a lot of circumstances for example in computing: He knows how to program it backwards.

3. know something backward(s) and forward(s)

Not used very much, but possible.

4. know something inside out

This is the most common form and regularly used in British speech.
He knows it inside out.

If I were teaching students, number 4 would be the one to teach.

James
http://www.jamesabela.co.uk/
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 12:44 am    Post subject: working week Reply with quote

Thank you very much.
Do these all work?
1. a five-day working week
2. a five-day work week
3. a five-day teaching week
4. a five-day school week

Thank you.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 12:49 am    Post subject: grass pitch Reply with quote

Is this understanding correct?
'a ground for cricket or soccer'
1. pitch - UK
2. field - US
Do 'grass pitch' and 'grass field' work too?

Thank you.
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eslweb



Joined: 31 May 2006
Posts: 208
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:26 am    Post subject: Pitches and fields Reply with quote

>1. a five-day working week
>2. a five-day work week
>3. a five-day teaching week
>4. a five-day school week

They all sound good to me, but generally most people would settle for
a five-day week. (Teaching or working is normally implied rather than stated.)

>1. pitch - UK
>2. field - US

There maybe some differences between British English and American English, but it isn't that simple...

In British English:

We do use field in British English and school children often say "let's go out and play in the field." The use of grass field is common in British English, especially in rural areas, but grass pitch is less common, because for it to be a pitch at all it pretty much HAS to be grass.

For it to be a pitch it needs to be used for certain sports, e.g. Cricket and football (soccer) and I think it is the sport that defines whether it is a field, pitch, court or track. Football (Soccer) is played on a pitch, Rugby/American Football is played in a field, tennis in a court, sprint on a track and so on.... That said the football pitch CAN be in a football field.

James
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you very much, eslweb, for such
detailed and valuable information.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2006 5:52 am    Post subject: tween Reply with quote

The ages given to the 'tween' seem to vary greatly
depending on the sources. 10-12, 11-12, etc.
I wonder what is the dependable one.
Also, is it countable? e.g. "They are tweens."

Thank you.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 5:59 am    Post subject: small money Reply with quote

such small ones like a one-dollar bill, one-cent coin:
Could we call them as follows?
1. a small bill / a small coin
2. a bill of a small denomination / a coin of a small denomination
3. small money (for both)
Also, is the opposite 'a big bill', 'a big coin' etc.?

Thank you.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2006 7:06 am    Post subject: Don't let's.... Reply with quote

Is this understanding correct?
1. Let's not argue. - AmE
2. Don't let's argue. - BrE
Thank you.
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eslweb



Joined: 31 May 2006
Posts: 208
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2006 6:00 am    Post subject: Let's not argue Reply with quote

1. Let's not argue. - AmE

I'd always say number 1 and I'm British...The other one doesn't sound natural to me....

James
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2006 6:20 am    Post subject: Don't let's.... Reply with quote

I see. Thank you very much, James.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2006 12:36 pm    Post subject: quite Reply with quote

If I said as follows, are they really praising comments
or not?
1. Your speech was quite interesting.
2. The dinner was quite nice.

Thank you.
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sbourque



Joined: 09 Dec 2004
Posts: 158
Location: USA

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If an American said them, they would be compliments, although we also use "interesting" as a euphemism for "I didn't really understand it."
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:58 am    Post subject: quite Reply with quote

Thank you very much, sbourque.
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John Hall



Joined: 20 Jan 2007
Posts: 31
Location: Costa Rica

PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2007 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is worth pointing out that many British people use the word "nice" almost exclusively in a sarcastic manner. I am Canadian. When I had a British girlfriend, I used to get into a lot of trouble if I told her, after she had just made herself up and gotten dressed to go out, that she looked nice! Exclamation
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