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Any Reading Material Suggestions?

 
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Maranwae



Joined: 14 Nov 2006
Posts: 1
Location: Daegu, Republic of Korea

PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 3:30 am    Post subject: Any Reading Material Suggestions? Reply with quote

I am currently teaching at a Hagwon and am trying to think of "real books" (i.e. novels) to use in the classroom instead of books like "Reading Success," "Reading Plus," "True Stories in the News," and such since there really isn't a story when it comes to those or there are too few words. The students I am teaching that I am looking for books for are in a few different classes. One class' age is about 10 (Western age), the second is about 12 (Western age), and the third is a group of students 13-15 (Western age). The two younger classes are a high beginner to low intermediate. The older class is just about intermediate. I thought of some books that I had used back stateside with a couple children learning English, but the Korean teachers took one look at the size of the book and the size of the text and said that they were too difficult. I even suggested books that elementary students (second to third grade students-USA) use. The problem we ran into there was that either the book is not in print here or it was an adapted book that the Korean teachers said was way too easy for the level. I have found some success with "Charlotte's Web" by E. B. White with another class, but am still looking for other options. So, any suggestions would be much appreciated.
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barista



Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Indianapolis, IN

PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2006 3:12 am    Post subject: Books for young adults Reply with quote

I'm not a teacher, but I'm going to start working on my certificate/Master's in January, so you might want to take this into account.

When I was growing up the books I remember reading in school were Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, and The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury. I thought Charlotte's Web was good (and is being made into a new movie). You might want to look into short story collections, as well.
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Senorita Daniels



Joined: 22 Dec 2004
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2006 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I was that age, I liked the Chronicles of Narnia. A Horse and His Boy has action and adventure, which the boys should enjoy.
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markwelch



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 3
Location: Pleasanton, CA

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 1:17 pm    Post subject: Re: Any Reading Material Suggestions? Reply with quote

[quote="Maranwae"] I am currently teaching at a Hagwon and am trying to think of "real books" (i.e. novels) to use in the classroom instead of books like "Reading Success," * * * [/quote]

Check out the list of "Top Books for Teens" at
http://www.welchenglish.com/top-books-for-teens.htm

For lesson plan resources for novels, see:
http://www.LitPlans.com/
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mrodas



Joined: 11 May 2007
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 11:18 pm    Post subject: Post reply: Any reading material suggestions? Reply with quote

Try The Eight Ball Club: Ocean of Fire by M.C. Pugin-Rodas. It's a novel written for secondary school ESL students by an ESL teacher and it's available on Amazon.com. It's about eight teens from diverse backgrounds who become trapped together inside of a volcano. There are vocab words, a glossary at the end, academic science words, easy-to-read fonts and spacing. The story is teen-interest with humor, love, and multicultural issues, and all at an intermediate language level.
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rusmeister



Joined: 29 Jan 2004
Posts: 44

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2007 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Senorita Daniels wrote:
When I was that age, I liked the Chronicles of Narnia. A Horse and His Boy has action and adventure, which the boys should enjoy.


All seven books in the series have action and adventure for boys and girls, and the language is not too difficult for the avg intermed pupil. With the films now coming out you've got an additional stimulus to get kids to read them.
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JessicaC



Joined: 29 May 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2007 6:54 pm    Post subject: Hello frm Lindsay CA Reply with quote

Hello!! I have been teaching in the U.S for three years. I taught 2nd and 3rd grade dual immersion classes. Among the books that I used with success were "Charlotte's Web" (which you already mentioned), books by Berverly Clearly (Ramone Quimby-a lot of fun), books of "Magic Tree House" (series), "The Secrets of Droon" (Series), "A Jigsaw Jones Mystery" (series), Junie B. Jones( Students love this). You can also try using biographies (you can do a lot of things with them)
I hope this helps,
JessicaC
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Senorita Daniels



Joined: 22 Dec 2004
Posts: 202

PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rusmeister wrote: All seven books in the series have action and adventure for boys and girls, and the language is not too difficult for the avg intermed pupil. With the films now coming out you've got an additional stimulus to get kids to read them.

Yes, they do. But for some reason, A Horse and His Boy really stands out as an adventure in my mind. Would it be possible for you to buy unadapted books online from Amazon, Barnes and Noble or some other store? You can sometimes find cheaper used versions on Amazon's site.
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mvr_moorthy



Joined: 02 Dec 2006
Posts: 4
Location: India

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 4:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For ESL classroom teaching one can try Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels", "Sindbad the sailor" select tales from "The Arabian Nights". For higher classes you can introduce books like H.G .Wells' "Time Machine" *beep*' "A Tale of Two cities" and Dumas' "The Three Musketeers".During the last year at school they can have a novel and a play--- Wilkie Collins' "Woman in White" and Shaw's "Arms and the Man"
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Yangxi



Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my country, China, when we were middle school students(aged 12-1Cool, our teachers gave us a list of English books for us to learn the language,
the title of that list was "Adolescence Literature", the books
of "Adolescence Literature" were both new-ly published(you could even contact with the writers if he or she was still alive.) or old, such as "robinson crusoe". So I suggest you search some information about " Adolescence Literature", I think this is a branch of Literature.
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JeremyintheCzechRep



Joined: 08 Jun 2008
Posts: 16
Location: Czech Republic

PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2008 5:14 am    Post subject: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Reply with quote

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon is written from the perspective of a 15 year old autistic boy - a fantastic book and the English is comparatively simple. A great read for children and adults.
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kittykoo



Joined: 18 Jun 2008
Posts: 4
Location: The land of ice and snow

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2008 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ESL students sometimes appreciate folktales and traditional stories from their own country in translation. It helps them to cross the threshold of L2 by starting with material that they are more comfortable and familiar with.
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