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How to write in exam?

 
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janie



Joined: 01 Apr 2004
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 2:03 am    Post subject: How to write in exam? Reply with quote

I just involved in how to prevent students from using the cliché in their wring. The examples such as “as a matter of fact” or “First…Second…Third” generally found in their paragraphs. Irritatingly, it looks like a formula that they picked up in cram school because almost all of them repeat the same sentence patterns! Most of them adopt baby English or even worse, “Chingish”; namely, Chinese English. However, some people argue that Chingish is not inferior to genuine English. Do foreigners (English native speaker) regard the Chingish as immature and unacceptable if the writer still make each point clear? As an English-majored student, I took western literature disciplines. Here, the academic writing, which imitates the literature pattern, is widely recognized by professors. We were taught to use more complicated sentence, and that can display our English proficiency. Doubtfully, is this the best way for students to learn writing? An educator suggests employing a great number of phrases, such as “in terms of”, “due to”, “in order to”, so as to prolong their sentences and look more sophisticated. This, however, is heard more preferable to the professors of the exam. Could anyone give me some advices to eradicate this degraded phenomenon? Some suggestions like reading-oriented improvement in writing seem intolerable for those wretched students, who have very limited time to face the upcoming entrance exam. Thank you!

Last edited by janie on Wed Apr 21, 2004 6:04 am; edited 2 times in total
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queensknight1125



Joined: 02 Apr 2004
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 3:52 am    Post subject: Avoiding cliches' and overused phrases Reply with quote

Dido/Janie,
I agree with you about the overuse of cliches' and certain phrases. When students give me papers that they have written, I find this to be a very common mistake. They also like to use large words to impress people about their knowledge of vocabulary. K.I.S.S. A phrase for them to remember...Keep it short and sweet! or Keep it simple, Stupid!!!

Be creative!!! If you have heard something said many times or have read it repeatedly, then it is probably a cliche'. Don't bore your audience! Be unique!!

Here are some websites that may be helpful...

http://writing2.richmond.edu/writing/wweb/cliche.html

List of Cliches'
http://www.suspense.net/whitefish/cliche.htm

http://www.thecoo.edu/~kequick/cliches.htm

This one should be helpful.....
http://owlet.letu.edu/grammarlinks/diction/diction2d.html

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turkeyblue



Joined: 04 Apr 2004
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun Apr 04, 2004 11:59 am    Post subject: naturally coherent Reply with quote

Smile

A good style of writing is not keen to its coherence by using conjuctive terms in the West. For the non-native English speakers to start with an English writing, it's helpful to hold on to those words to orginize the content and remain coherence by paraphrasing different points. But it's defenitely not necessary for a good layout afterwards. I like your topic and it's really interesting to discuss about.
April x
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mogli



Joined: 02 Apr 2004
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2004 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Janie:
Most writing teachers in my reach usually against prolonging attempts.
In the tactic concerns, if you could still recall, some believe long and sophisticated sentences catch a relatively greater attention from teachers so that the essay will thus be highlighted.
I can't deny that's some smart move, but writers also chanllenge teachers' patient.
While writing, there must be something else no less imperative than the idea.
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