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how to start a class

 
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mmaille



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2003 10:02 pm    Post subject: how to start a class Reply with quote

I m fairly new to group teaching and have so far only dealt with one to ones. I have a group of 8 Italian tenagers to teach for 5 days, 3hours per day. Does anyone have any ideas as to how I could begin this class on the first day? Initially, of course introduction etc: but what then?
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stephen



Joined: 25 Feb 2003
Posts: 97

PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2003 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What level are these students?

Stephen
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mmaille



Joined: 16 Jan 2003
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2003 4:11 pm    Post subject: to steven Reply with quote

The students are 15/16 years old.............pre-intermediate/intermediate
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stephen



Joined: 25 Feb 2003
Posts: 97

PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2003 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do they already know each other?

If not, then I'd suggest some activities to get to know each other. Maybe have them interview a partner and report back to the class about their partner, or have them write a questionnaire in pairs/two groups and have them interview members of the other group/pairs using the questionnaire.

As for what to do after this, it is more tricky. Primarily because you don't know exactly what level they are. You could do some speaking activities to break the ice and get them used to working with each other, I'd suggest maybe looking at "Discussions that work" P. Ur or "Keep Talking" (sorry can't spell the author's name without having it in front of me.)

The kind of thing I mean is giving them a senerio such as below and have them work out what to do (in English) in pairs/two groups and then having them report back to the class.

Your plane has crashed in the middle of the desert about a hundred miles from the nearest town. You are the only survivor. The plane is on fire and you have only got time to save 3 items. What will you save and how will you save yourself?
map
bottled water
gun
salt tablets
compass
mirror
money
coat
[any more you can think of]


(For reference the mirror, water and coat are the best choices. The mirror can be used to reflect the sun and attract help and so is most important; the coat is important because the desert gets cold at night. The chances of successfully navigating 100 miles on foot across a desert after having been in a plane crash are not high.)

In the longer term you will probably find a textbook will help, as it will give you some structure. After you've been doing classes at this level a while you may prefer to do without, but initially they are useful because they sequence grammar (and provide readings and listenings.) However, generally most textbooks deal with grammar badly, lots of gap-fills and equally excorable activities. This means you will almost certainly need to supplement heavily. I would advise definately looking at "Grammar Practice Activities" P. Ur (the first teaching book I pack when moving country) also "Elementary Communication Activities" or "Intermediate Communication Activities" by J. Hadfield (but unfortunately some of the activities will not work with under 8 students, so be prepared with a back up in case someone is sick), also the Reward Series of textbooks (which are the worst textbooks I have ever had the displeasure of using) have an excellent set of photocopiable teacher's resourcebooks (which can be purchsed seperately.)

Regarding textbooks it is difficult to say (if you're not sure exactly of the level) but for short courses the clockwise series isn't bad. For a good pre-intermediate textbook take a look at New Pre-intermediate Headway (avoid the old one it was terrible.) For intermediate the clockwise book might be worth looking at, New Intermediate Headway is ok for listening and reading, terrible for grammar and seems to include virtually no speaking (Great if you just want your textbook to provide listening and readings, terrible if you don't!) The New Interchange textbooks are like used toilet paper (they come with c*** already printed on the pages.)

Hope this helps,
Stephen
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scribble



Joined: 31 Mar 2003
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 5:59 am    Post subject: e-mesh.com articles Reply with quote

Try these two articles for some possibilities

http://www.e-mesh.com/members/teachers/pdf/tc_art_beginnings.pdf

http://www.e-mesh.com/members/teachers/pdf/tc_qt_firstdayacts001.pdf
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