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'As per' Usage

 
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kapvijay



Joined: 12 Aug 2011
Posts: 30
Location: Coimbatore, India

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 6:11 am    Post subject: 'As per' Usage Reply with quote

Is 'as per' a Subordinative Conjunction in the following sentence?

"Treatment given as per doctor's order'
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fluffyhamster



Joined: 26 Oct 2004
Posts: 3012
Location: UK > China > Japan > UK again

PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dictionaries don't analyze it further than labelling it an idiom, while in grammars (e.g. the LGSWE, pg 75) it is listed simply as a complex (i.e. multi-word) preposition. I don't think it is worth trying to break it down beyond that, so you'd probably be best just trying to think of synonyms e.g. according to, in accordance with, in compliance with, in line with, etc.
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kapvijay



Joined: 12 Aug 2011
Posts: 30
Location: Coimbatore, India

PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you fluffyhamster.

If we name 'as per' complex preposition, the sentence will be called 'simple sentence'. isn't it?
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fluffyhamster



Joined: 26 Oct 2004
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Location: UK > China > Japan > UK again

PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2013 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for not addressing your question of subordination. My understanding is that 'as per doctor's orders' is an adverbial (the whole could be replaced with e.g. 'correctly'), and it isn't a clause (further clause) but rather just an element (a phrase) in yes a simple sentence. The "complexity" (that is, simply multiwordedness of what would otherwise have been a single word) is confined just to the (name of the) preposition.
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kapvijay



Joined: 12 Aug 2011
Posts: 30
Location: Coimbatore, India

PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello fluffyhamster, Thank you for confirming that the sentence is simple.
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fluffyhamster



Joined: 26 Oct 2004
Posts: 3012
Location: UK > China > Japan > UK again

PostPosted: Thu Dec 19, 2013 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well we're calling it a sentence but it's a bit abbreviated and note-like. It could even conceivably be just a noun phrase containing a reduced relative clause (i.e. other clauses could come before or after it: ... X ... ). Hard to say out of context!
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