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what is the difference between stress and intonation?

 
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davidc



Joined: 18 Jun 2003
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2003 4:30 pm    Post subject: what is the difference between stress and intonation? Reply with quote

This question has me absolutely stumped. Im trying to create a TEFL glossary of terms, and distinguishing between stress and intonation is proving impossible.

It seems that most sources include pitch changes, aspiration and syllable length in the definitions of both terms. Can anyone help me with this??
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Norm Ryder



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Posts: 118
Location: Canberra, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2003 7:17 am    Post subject: Stress and intonation Reply with quote

David
This is the definition of intonation given in The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar:
"Phonetics: The pitch variations and patterns in spoken language.
The total meaning of a spoken utterance derives not only from the actual words and patterns of STRESS, but also from the PITCH patterns used (the rises and falls in pitch). Intonation is concerned with the operation of such patterns over sequences of words (TONE UNITS). It is not easy to categorise, but a number of typical intonation patterns have been identified.

Intonation plays a part in speech not unlike pucntiation in the written language. ..... It also has an important function in conveying attitude."

David, the words in upper case refer to other entries in the dictionary, and if you don't have access to it, I can give you any of those as well. I've also left out the examples of how intonation functions like punctuation.

Hope this gives you a good start.

Norm
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EH



Joined: 17 Jan 2003
Posts: 174
Location: USA and/or Korea

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2003 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is just my own definition. I'm not quoting a published source, so take this with a grain of salt.

Stress: shown in English through raised pitch, lengthened syllable duration, pauses before/after the stress, and often facial expressions or gestures as well. A speaker can stress a syllable, word, or group of words.

Intonation: refers to pitch, syllable length, and pause contours throughout utterances and to the general speech patterns of a speaker.

I see stress as being more specific ("He stressed that word"), and intonation as being more general ("His intonation is a little weird").

But that's just my take on it.

Good luck!
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Norm Ryder



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Posts: 118
Location: Canberra, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2003 7:35 am    Post subject: Intonation and Stress Reply with quote

EH

I like your word "contour". The Dictionary also adds "greater force" or "energy" to the words you offered to describe "stress".

And apologies for the sloppy proofreading, david, that let through that horrible spelling of punctuation!
Cheers.
Norm.
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