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Teaching asylum seekers in Britain

 
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emmajhills



Joined: 18 Jul 2003
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Jul 18, 2003 8:50 am    Post subject: Teaching asylum seekers in Britain Reply with quote

Does anyone have any information about teaching asylum seekers in Britain?

I would like to find out:

Where are positions most commonly found?
Who do I contact to apply for jobs?
Is the work generally full-time or part-time?
How easy/difficult is it to get these kind of positions?

I am currently volunteering with refugees in Thailand. I want to return to Britain next Spring and ideally, I would like to have some work to come back to. Any help, suggestions or contacts would be very gratefully received.
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Aihuadaing



Joined: 21 Jul 2003
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2003 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm in a similar position with similar goals and I'd be interested to hear what you come across. Once or twice, I've seen jobs advertised on www.tefl.com teaching refugees in England. Could you PM me if you find anything useful? I'll do likewise.
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Will.



Joined: 02 Feb 2003
Posts: 16
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Emma,

Your best bet for this area of teaching is to focus on the FE (further education) sector of ESOL ( English for Speakers of Other Languages)
The Guardian website and the Times Educational Supplement website
both have jobsearch facilities. The money can be good, dependent upon qualifications.
this is a growing market here at the moment. The reason is mainly to do with government funding and every college and education provider jumping on the bandwagon in the search for bums on seats. It is not EFL as we know it. mainly low level classes and those who have not received a formal education so you can have a class with extreme cases of differentiation at the same level of spoken ability but learners unable to read or write( even in their own language)
There is also a desire from employers to have other qualifications as well as the CELTA or CTESOL.
Any more questions ? As you are already involved in this field and, as such, have made a commitment feel free to PM me. I have recently quit a well paid job doing just what you want to do.

http://jobs.guardian.co.uk/
http://www.jobs.tes.co.uk/
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Vasya



Joined: 25 Jun 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh really? Smile Smile Smile
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BobHale



Joined: 12 Mar 2006
Posts: 1
Location: Birmingham. England

PostPosted: Sun Jul 09, 2006 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spring or the start of summer are good times to be looking as that's when the majority of colleges start to look for ESOL teachers for their summer schools and for the September term.
There are both permanent and contract jobs with colleges and both full-time and part-time. Colleges always have trouble filling the evening and weekend teaching slots so there is often part-time work available there.
A couple of things you need to know.
Many colleges are now, for funding reasons, only taking on contract staff via single agency deals. The college where I teach as of September will only have contract staff through Protocol - at 3 an hour less than they have been on when employed direct.
Also the Government is extremely keen at the moment on embedding courses so we have courses teaching ESOL as part of Motor Vehicle, ESOL as part of Child Care, ESOL as part of Textiles and so on. Embedding is rapidly replacing differentiation as the buzzword of the day.
There are also more and more pre-18s (and pre-16s) in FE colleges, students who can't find places in regular schools or sometime who have been excluded. Even in ESOL classes we are seeing more youngsters and our college runs special classes made up of pre-19s with no regard to the students level so extreme differentiation needs are the norm in those particular classes.
In the adult classes it's not as bad, although, as was previously mentioned, there can be wide variations between students spoken and written abilities.
One other thing. If it's a permanent post you are looking for you will probably need to make a commitment to studying for a Cert-Ed or PGCE if you don't already have one.

If none of that has put you off then I'd suggest that as soon as you return to the UK find the addresses of all the FE colleges in your area and send your CV in to the ESOL/Basic Skills division. You should find it quite easy to get part-time contract work.
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