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Questions from Itasan
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tigertiger



Joined: 13 Nov 2005
Posts: 246

PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2006 4:55 am    Post subject: Re: flannel panel Reply with quote

Itasan wrote:
Thank you. By the way:
'flannel panel'
I have read some kind of definition on this, but I cannot
grasp the image too well. I wonder if I could have some
sample articles of this kind.

Thank you.


A panel could be a panel of people. So a flannel pannel would be a group of speakers who are only there to give their opinions (mostly hot air). For example on a TV or Radio programme with invited panel of (not so) 'experts'.
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tigertiger



Joined: 13 Nov 2005
Posts: 246

PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2006 4:59 am    Post subject: Re: Just goes to show you learn something everyday... Reply with quote

Backbiting
eslweb wrote:
Thanks for the clarification...And I checked it in the Complete Oxford English Dictionary. It is actually quite an old word having first appearing in about 1175. It's definitely of British-English origin... Embarassed

I'd have said it wasn't in common usage, but I'll leave that to the forum to decide... Wink


I have heard this used a lot in Christian circles, especially by charismatic evangelicals.
I guess they like good old fasioned words. I might also be used in the King James (1611), or Revised Standard versions of the Bible.
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tigertiger



Joined: 13 Nov 2005
Posts: 246

PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2006 5:11 am    Post subject: Re: interchange Reply with quote

Itasan wrote:
Thank you very much, everybody.
'interchange'
CALD says: UK a junction at which smaller roads meet a larger
road, especially a motorway
I wonder what is the US equivalent.

Thank you.


To be more precise.

Motorway Junction.
Where one (or more) road(s) join a motorway. Where you can join the motorway in either direction. i.e. it is possible to join the motorway's northbound and southbound carriageway. It is also possible to exit the motorway if travelling either north or south and join the lesser road in eiter direction (e.g. east and west).

Motorway Interchange
Entry to and/or exit from the Motorway may be limited.
E.G. UK M5 Jct 11a.
It is possible to leave the M5 motorway when travelling on the northbound carriageway, it is not possible to join the M5 and travel northbound.
It is possible to Join the M5 and travel southbound. It is not possible to exit the motorway if you are on the southbound carriageway.


To be fair, most people in the UK do not know this unless they are in transportation or roads industry. So the words are used synonymously, but incorrectly so.
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Amy_H



Joined: 11 Nov 2005
Posts: 53
Location: New England

PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2006 2:59 pm    Post subject: Re: flannel panel Reply with quote

Itasan wrote:

'flannel panel'
I have read some kind of definition on this, but I cannot
grasp the image too well. I wonder if I could have some
sample articles of this kind.

Hi Itasan
I found these for "flannel panel":
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flannel_panel
http://www.magforum.com/glossaryd.htm
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=749639

But, since you had already heard about the reference to hot air, I assume you may have seen the above links already.

A "flannel panel" is apparently more formally called "masthead (panel)". The "flannel panel" lists of all those who contributed or helped in any way (editors, writers, designers, etc.) in the publication of a magazine.
This link is a sample of a masthead:
http://www.princeton.edu/~spectatr/vol2/may97/mast10.gif

I'd heard "masthead" before, but not "flannel panel".

Amy
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 12:06 am    Post subject: left coast Reply with quote

Is 'left coast' used in the meaning of 'West Coast'
both in the US and UK? How about 'right coast'?

Thank you.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 11:17 pm    Post subject: joyriding Reply with quote

joyriding
It seems to mean 'the crime of stealing a vehicle and
driving fast and dangerously for fun' in BrE.
I wonder what is the American equivalent.

Thank you.
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eslweb



Joined: 31 May 2006
Posts: 208
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 6:25 am    Post subject: American Equivalent Reply with quote

In American films and games I've heard a lot of people talking about Grand Theft Auto, GTA (Made famous by the game) or boosting a car.

For the UK, joyriding is definitely the word of choice for youngsters stealing cars to drive around too fast...

James
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eslweb



Joined: 31 May 2006
Posts: 208
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 6:33 am    Post subject: left coast and right coast.... Reply with quote

>Is 'left coast' used in the meaning of 'West Coast'
>both in the US and UK? How about 'right coast'?

We generally don't refer to the coasts as left coast and right coast, but you'd probably be understood.

People generally prefer East coast, South-West Coast etc Please bear in mind that much of the West Coast is in Wales and not in England, and also we often call the coast by the name of the county e.g. The Lincolnshire coastline or just the coast... Because it's not such a big country as America it isn't such a useful goegraphic device. e.g. for timezones etc.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 6:51 am    Post subject: Re: American Equivalent Reply with quote

eslweb wrote:
In American films and games I've heard a lot of people talking about Grand Theft Auto, GTA (Made famous by the game) or boosting a car.

For the UK, joyriding is definitely the word of choice for youngsters stealing cars to drive around too fast...

James


Thank you very much, James.
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Amy_H



Joined: 11 Nov 2005
Posts: 53
Location: New England

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Itasan

The term joyriding is well-known in the US, too. Joyriding is driving a car simply for pleasure and excitement, and the driving is often done recklessly and at high speed. The car is often driven without the owner's permission. In the US joyriding doesn't necessarily mean that the car was stolen.

"Grand theft auto" is a legal term used when someone is charged with the crime of stealing a motor vehicle (usually a car). This term refers only to the theft.

Amy
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 10:24 pm    Post subject: joyriding Reply with quote

Thank you very much, Amy, for
the valuable information.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 7:42 am    Post subject: join/get in queue/line Reply with quote

Do these all work?
1. Join the queue.
2. Join queue.
3. Get in the line.
4. Get in line.

Thank you.
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eslweb



Joined: 31 May 2006
Posts: 208
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2006 11:37 am    Post subject: Queues and lines... Reply with quote

1. Join the queue.
Yes, perfectly normal.

2. Join queue.
No, we don't normally skip the article in this phrase. (British)

3. Get in the line.
We would say it if there was more than one line or we wanted to emphasise the word line. (As a command)

4. Get in line.
Normally used as a command, when somebody is trying to skip the queue.

None of these would be considered polite in British English without please
e.g. Please join the queue or join the queue please.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2006 11:44 am    Post subject: join/get in queue/line Reply with quote

Thank you very much, eslweb.
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Itasan



Joined: 05 Nov 2003
Posts: 557
Location: Yokohama, Japan

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2006 6:48 am    Post subject: know backwards Reply with quote

Do these all work?
1. know something backward
2. know something backwards
3. know something backward(s) and forward(s)
4. know something inside out

Thank you.
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