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Lists of connectors and logical relators for writing class?

 
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teacherli



Joined: 06 Nov 2003
Posts: 2
Location: China

PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2003 2:01 am    Post subject: Lists of connectors and logical relators for writing class? Reply with quote

Hi!

We all know they exist: those terms that give us some clue about the nature of the next paragraph:

AND (also related to the previous paragraph)
THEREFORE (some sort of result based on the previous paragraph)
HOWEVER (something opposite to what was just said)
ALTHOUGH
BECAUSE

..and so on.

Does anyone know where I can find such a list and their simple definitions? I'd love to get my students to understand and use them correctly!

Any help would be appreciated... even if you know another name for them that I can use to "Google"...

Thanks!
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szwagier



Joined: 08 Nov 2003
Posts: 51
Location: Kraków

PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2003 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's one for starters:

http://esl.about.com/library/writing/blwrite_connectors.htm

I generally find that adult learners, who are usually used to logical argument and cause and effect, don't need definitions so much as categorisation - contrast, concession, addition, or whatever - and example. Once they know that "although" introduces a concessive clause, they don't usually have much difficulty with the semantics - word order and punctuation are bigger problems.

I have very little experience of teaching kids or teenagers, but I'd guess (help me out here, guys Question ) that it's not worth teaching logical connectors to kids who are too young to be able to construct a logical argument, and younger teenagers are still getting to grips with the concepts in their mother tongue, so gentleness would be the watchword there, too.

By the way, my feeling is that they absolutely don't have to know the term "concessive clause" unless they are avid readers of grammar reference books, it's the concept that's important, so give it a name that won't have them dashing for the dictionaries! Too much metalanguage gets in the way of language itself for most learners.

Hope this isn't too late to be of some use Smile
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strider



Joined: 17 Jan 2003
Posts: 160
Location: France

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2003 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is something I often teach to my students (I call them Linking Words)

There's 4 chapters on this in a book called 'Business Grammar Builder' (Paul Emmerson, Macmillan). Good explanations, good exercises but not for beginners. Student would have to be Intermediate and above.
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Lorikeet



Joined: 18 May 2003
Posts: 1368
Location: San Francisco, California

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2003 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

strider wrote:
There's 4 chapters on this in a book called 'Business Grammar Builder'


Aha Strider, you sure this doesn't belong as an example in the discussion in the Applied Linguistics thread of there is and there are? I said the trend was toward using there's to mean both there isand there are and further claimed I have caught myself doing it from time to time, despite my desire not to do so. Wink

Lorikeet
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strider



Joined: 17 Jan 2003
Posts: 160
Location: France

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2003 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Embarassed

And while we are on the subect, try the punctuation test at :

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/3256388.stm

I must admit I only got 6 out of 10. Embarassed again! I'm certainly having a bad punctuation day!
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Andrew Patterson



Joined: 02 Feb 2004
Posts: 922
Location: Poland

PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2004 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teacherli,

Here's my list. But before you start giving out whole lists, understand that memorising long lists is not not a very useful teaching strategy. Split it up or use it as a reference guide for your students and yourself.

Comprehensive List of English Conjunctions
Addition: again, also, and, and then, besides, equally important, finally, first, further, furthermore, in addition, in the first place, last, moreover, next, second, still, too

Cause: because, since, as

Comparison: also, in the same way, likewise, similarly

Concession: granted, naturally, of course, albeit (includes idea of contrast)

Contrast: although, and yet, at the same time, but at the same time, despite, despite that, even so, even though, for all that, however, in contrast, in spite of, instead, nevertheless, notwithstanding, on the contrary, on the other hand, otherwise, regardless, still, though, yet, albeit (includes idea of concession)

Conditionality: if, when, provided that, providing that, in case, assuming that, as long as

Negative Conditionality: unless

Un-conditionality: even if, whether or not

Degree: inasmuch as, insofar as, to the extent that

Effect: so, therefore, hence

Emphasis: certainly, indeed, in fact, of course

Example or Illustration: after all, as an illustration, even, for example, for instance, indeed, in fact, in other words, in short, it is true, of course, namely, specifically, that is, to illustrate, thus, truly, viz.

[color=red]Summary[/color]: all in all, altogether, as has been said, finally, in brief, in conclusion, in other words, in particular, in short, in simpler terms, in summary, on the whole, that is, therefore, to put it differently, to summarize

Time or Sequence: after, after a while, afterward, again, also, and then, as long as, at, at last, at length, at that time, before, besides, earlier, eventually, finally, formerly, in the past, last, lately, meanwhile, next, now, presently, second, shortly, simultaneously, since, so far, soon, still, subsequently, then, thereafter, too, until, until now, when, as soon as, whenever, while, whilst, once, recently

Place: where, wherever

Co-ordinating Conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so (Memory aid: They make the acronym F.A.N.B.O.Y. S.)

Correlative conjunctions:
both . . . and not only . . . but also not . . . but
either . . . or neither . . . nor whether . . . or not
as . . . as

Andrew Patterson
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