Site Search:
 

Banner

Teacher Discussion Forums Forum Index Teacher Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Please help... teaching listening & note-taking strategi

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Teacher Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Adult Education
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ab j



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 5:01 am    Post subject: Please help... teaching listening & note-taking strategi Reply with quote

Dear all,
I teach the advanced in a Foundation Program and my problem is the students are not attentive and not enjoying the listening lectures no matter what I do .

For pre-listening activities, I use brainstorming or some YouTube activities. However, once I start the recording they lose track and tell me they are bored.

Your suggestions and tips are much appreciated.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
alawton



Joined: 27 Jul 2009
Posts: 45
Location: Austin, TX

PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 3:10 am    Post subject: listening Reply with quote

Students to tend to drift off when listening to a recording. Could you read it yourself? Maybe throw in some of your own words. An activity I like to do, in regards to listening activities, is to read and make an occasional error. The student who detects the error gets an extra point, or whatever motivational tool you use. I hope this helps!




Andrew Lawton
http://drewseslfluencylessons.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Sally Olsen



Joined: 08 Apr 2004
Posts: 1304
Location: Canada,France, Brazil, Japan, Mongolia, Greenland, Canada, Mongolia, Ethiopia next

PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We had speakers once a week and I used to take notes on the board while they were talking. You could do the same as they listen to the recording. I used mind mapping and several other note taking techniques and varied it each week until all the students had a strategy for note taking that they felt comfortable with. I put the structure of the note taking on a poster the day after until we had several possibilities.

After the lecture, I went over the notes and most of the students were amazed that they then understood the lecture. They didn't think they had heard or understood anything if you didn't do that.

You could give them a script of one lecture to follow. They can discuss the major points, the way that a lecture is set up to give information and where they can find the major points, what to write down and how and how to use the information afterwards. It might take you three or four lessons on one lecture but the rest will go more quickly and be more interesting if they actually understand the structure.

You could share the notes of the best of the students so the rest can see what note taking is like and how it is useful. Have the best students write on overheads or if possible run off their notes for everyone to have a copy or type out their notes with corrections for everyone to have a copy.

They can then work in groups on a short lecture and include all the things that they would like to see in a lecture, give the lecture and get positive feedback and constructive feedback from the rest of the class as to what they have missed. They could have one of the recordings for background material if you have to cover a certain number of prescribed lectures or topics.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ab j



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:22 am    Post subject: Re: listening Reply with quote

alawton wrote:
Students to tend to drift off when listening to a recording. Could you read it yourself? Maybe throw in some of your own words. An activity I like to do, in regards to listening activities, is to read and make an occasional error. The student who detects the error gets an extra point, or whatever motivational tool you use. I hope this helps!



Andrew Lawton
http://drewseslfluencylessons.com


Thank you so much Andrew. I liked this activity and will give it a try in September when classes start. Thanks again
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ab j



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sally Olsen wrote:
We had speakers once a week and I used to take notes on the board while they were talking. You could do the same as they listen to the recording. I used mind mapping and several other note taking techniques and varied it each week until all the students had a strategy for note taking that they felt comfortable with. I put the structure of the note taking on a poster the day after until we had several possibilities.

After the lecture, I went over the notes and most of the students were amazed that they then understood the lecture. They didn't think they had heard or understood anything if you didn't do that.

You could give them a script of one lecture to follow. They can discuss the major points, the way that a lecture is set up to give information and where they can find the major points, what to write down and how and how to use the information afterwards. It might take you three or four lessons on one lecture but the rest will go more quickly and be more interesting if they actually understand the structure.

You could share the notes of the best of the students so the rest can see what note taking is like and how it is useful. Have the best students write on overheads or if possible run off their notes for everyone to have a copy or type out their notes with corrections for everyone to have a copy.

They can then work in groups on a short lecture and include all the things that they would like to see in a lecture, give the lecture and get positive feedback and constructive feedback from the rest of the class as to what they have missed. They could have one of the recordings for background material if you have to cover a certain number of prescribed lectures or topics.


Thanks a lot for your great ideas. They are of great help.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Betty Swollocks



Joined: 20 Mar 2010
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Tue Mar 23, 2010 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"An activity I like to do, in regards to listening activities, is to read and make an occasional error. The student who detects the error gets an extra point"

Thank you, I tried this and it worked very well. I changed it slightly by first asking them "How many mistakes I made?" So they just ticked off everytime they heard a mistake...make the mistakes obvious though. Then i read it again and we discuss the mistakes.

Another thing I tried is a recap exercise. Give students 2 minutes to note down as many things as they can about the last lesson ie "What did we do?" Then get them to compare notes and ad anything they might have missed. Then show them your lesson plan of what you actually did...this is a great recap.

It also encourages writing keywords (because of the time period) Rather than full sentences. You can then convert them to full sentences as an extension
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Teacher Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Adult Education All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Teachers College, Columbia University: Train to Teach English Here or Abroad
SIT

This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group