Search found 31 matches

by John Hall
Thu Aug 09, 2007 4:27 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: H
Replies: 8
Views: 1108

Gotta agree with Lorikeet that "ch" = "tsh." Spanish speakers often pronounce an initial "ch" as an "sh" (saying "challenge" as "shallenge," for example). I've been getting them to correct it by telling them that the "ch" in "challenge" is the same as the "ch" in "much." In a sense, the "tch" in suc...
by John Hall
Sat Jul 28, 2007 3:04 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Punctuation Issue
Replies: 8
Views: 1297

Is that really okay to have two question marks (not counting the one in "Could I do that?") in one question?
by John Hall
Fri Jul 27, 2007 4:40 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: How much time spent on ums and such?
Replies: 17
Views: 2061

What a Spanish speaker says when spelling her name:

"My name is Lourdes. L ... O ... ehhh ... U ... ehhhh ... R ... D ... ehhh ... E ... S"

What a native English speaker hears that Spanish speaker saying:

"My name is Lourdes. L ... O ... A ... U ... A ... R ... D ... A ... E ... S."
by John Hall
Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:32 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Punctuation Issue
Replies: 8
Views: 1297

Yes, but how can you include 'with the word "that" referring to "speaking English with me?"' Also, is it correct to put that last question mark inside or outside the quotations marks?
by John Hall
Fri Jul 27, 2007 12:22 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Punctuation Issue
Replies: 8
Views: 1297

Punctuation Issue

Which is best?

a) Did you mean to say this:

"Could I do that?"

with the word "that" referring to "speaking English with me?"

b) Did you mean to say this?

"Could I do that?"

with the word "that" referring to "speaking English with me."

c) Some other variation of the punctuation.
by John Hall
Thu Jul 26, 2007 5:26 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Mistake Vs. Error - definition
Replies: 20
Views: 46275

I've been reading H. Douglas Brown's Teaching by Principles, 2nd ed., and he uses the above/mentioned distinction between error and mistake, as well as the term "fossilization." Different experts use different terminology.
by John Hall
Thu Jul 26, 2007 5:17 pm
Forum: Business English
Topic: claim credit
Replies: 2
Views: 1300

I would say that it means that the President believes that he is the one primarily responsible for the success of each accomplishment.
by John Hall
Thu Jul 26, 2007 5:14 pm
Forum: Business English
Topic: be covered in confusion
Replies: 1
Views: 1314

I guess that it would mean that she is totally immersed in confusion. However, I would never write or say a sentence like that. To me, it sounds like bad English.
by John Hall
Thu Jul 12, 2007 5:59 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Responsibility
Replies: 15
Views: 2086

Re: Responsibility

Is it our main responsibility as language teachers to help produce language users whose primings harmonise with those already in positions of influence or power (see below)? This could be so, but only to a certain extent. In learning a second language, we make it possible for ourselves to be influe...
by John Hall
Thu Jul 12, 2007 5:25 pm
Forum: Business English
Topic: breadth of vision
Replies: 3
Views: 2851

Doesn't "vision" here refer to perspective or foresight?
by John Hall
Thu Jul 12, 2007 5:21 pm
Forum: Business English
Topic: in years to come
Replies: 2
Views: 1540

Re: in years to come

These posters will surely be worth millions in years to come!" "What will this nation be in years to come?" I think those mean 'after several years have passed from now'. "She will be teaching English in years to come." She will not be teaching English for several years, right? Could that also mean...
by John Hall
Thu Jul 12, 2007 5:15 pm
Forum: Business English
Topic: do a double take
Replies: 2
Views: 1547

As I understand this, "take" means "view" in this expression. "To do a double take" is to look at something, then look away, and then look again because you don't believe or are very surprised by what you see.
by John Hall
Fri Mar 02, 2007 11:36 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: How would you paraphrase this?
Replies: 2
Views: 701

Re: How would you paraphrase this?

Definitely a.
by John Hall
Fri Mar 02, 2007 7:40 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Mistake Vs. Error - definition
Replies: 20
Views: 46275

Stephen, This distinction does not exist only in my own head. As I mentioned, I am only passing on what some other teachers have told me. I don't know how popular this distinction is, or where it came from. I also suspect that it is not in the dictionary. However, I have encountered more than one te...
by John Hall
Fri Mar 02, 2007 1:02 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Mistake Vs. Error - definition
Replies: 20
Views: 46275

I had never heard that there was a difference between a mistake and an error until a certain trainer of mine brought it up. A mistake is a wrong response that if you thought about it you would realize is wrong. An error is a wrong response because you have no knowledge about what the right answer is...