Search found 265 matches

by dduck
Mon May 10, 2004 11:15 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: And or Or; That is the question.
Replies: 3
Views: 1160

I'd just like to mention that using 'or' in the sentence implies that the exam is taken at least once, whereas 'and' implies twice.

Iain
by dduck
Fri May 07, 2004 2:10 pm
Forum: Adult Education
Topic: FCE grammar question
Replies: 2
Views: 1292

I'd say it's not very common usage, so it's not worth worrying about. If you HAVE TO worry about it, I'd be forced to agree that it's "old fashioned, but correct".

Iain
by dduck
Fri May 07, 2004 2:05 pm
Forum: Elementary Education
Topic: students not understanding
Replies: 1
Views: 1865

There are a few things to consider, 1) that the students aren't grasping the material, 2) time pressures and 3) the class aims. If you worry about the time pressures too much you end up rushing everything, ending up with a class of students who have learnt nothing at all! Better to slow the pace of ...
by dduck
Tue Dec 23, 2003 11:42 am
Forum: Computer Assisted Language Learning
Topic: internet chatrooms
Replies: 1
Views: 2099

I don't like chatrooms myself, but some people seem to thrive on them. Or perhaps they're just using messenger to chat to their friends. Chatting is not something I do a lot of. In general, I've found it extremely dull, and often the language is very crude. I wouldn't be happy exposing my students t...
by dduck
Tue Dec 23, 2003 11:35 am
Forum: Adult Education
Topic: New to all this
Replies: 2
Views: 1363

You are most welcome, Elizabeth! :D Starting off by reading what's gone on before shows us all what an enlightened person you are. I wish more newbies were like you!

Iain
by dduck
Tue Dec 23, 2003 11:31 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Confused Am I with the Past Perfect
Replies: 33
Views: 11511

Isn't it more natural, i.e. more correct, to simply say: "I'll give you a ring before you finish writing the memo".? I don't think you should match correct with natural . There are lots of things to do with language which are correct but not natural, in some people's opinion. Further, I don't agree...
by dduck
Fri Dec 19, 2003 11:35 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Krashen's Natural approach
Replies: 15
Views: 11373

Stephen, a very well written post, with which I have very little quibble, except perhaps with the first line. You've inspired me to re-examine what Romeo wrote: disclaimer - and this is a biggie. I've not been able to get my hands on a copy of Krashen's book. I'm in Spain and haven't been able to fi...
by dduck
Thu Dec 18, 2003 3:15 pm
Forum: Adult Education
Topic: end of story ?
Replies: 16
Views: 4631

I suspect it comes from Latin, what exactly I don't know. But in Spanish (which I've come to learn is a vulgar latin) it means to bite, as in an insect bite. You ignore the mosquito until it bites into you (you're bitten ,"picado") and then you take an interest in it.

Iain
by dduck
Thu Dec 18, 2003 3:10 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Krashen's Natural approach
Replies: 15
Views: 11373

The article disgusts me too much to reread - my understanding of the authors meaning is: we shouldn't rely on Krashen's methods, because they are not scientifically researched. I agree with your latter comment, Vytenis, that students would benefit from a dose of Krashen. In general, I prefer teacher...
by dduck
Wed Dec 17, 2003 8:23 pm
Forum: Pronunciation
Topic: To Reduce or Not to Reduce: That is the Question
Replies: 15
Views: 8542

sita wrote:Sadly a number of German colleagues also do not teach this because it is bad English....
The counter to that is "I teach REAL English, not supposed correct English!"

Iain
by dduck
Wed Dec 17, 2003 8:20 pm
Forum: Adult Education
Topic: end of story ?
Replies: 16
Views: 4631

I'd love to know why Americans use "period". And I agree with Lorikeet, "period" is much punchier than "full stop" and for that reason I sometimes use it too. :) According to Webster, pique also means: 2 a : to excite or arouse by a provocation , challenge, or rebuff <sly remarks to pique their curi...
by dduck
Wed Dec 17, 2003 12:44 pm
Forum: Adult Education
Topic: end of story ?
Replies: 16
Views: 4631

I'm glad I piqued your interest. I'm proud to bring to the fore a little of British culture! I think "full-stop" is clearer because at the end of a sentence we stop , we don't just pause awhile to look around, we stop fully . I don't object to the US period , but the student may ask period of what? ...
by dduck
Wed Dec 17, 2003 12:21 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: should, must, etc.
Replies: 17
Views: 5935

Regarding the website I chose - I looked round a few locations, but there's so much vagueness written about this subject that I found it hard to post anything I liked. If anyone can provide a good link, I'll be sure to make a note of it!

Iain
by dduck
Mon Dec 15, 2003 5:26 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Translator's pains
Replies: 22
Views: 4983

Her translation sounded something like this: "In this article it is discussed the foundation of the social sciences faculty of Siauliai Universit, the first five years of activities of this faculty etc. etc...... " something like that. Weird! It doesn't look to bad to me. It a bit weird, mind you, ...
by dduck
Mon Dec 15, 2003 5:21 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: should, must, etc.
Replies: 17
Views: 5935

I have never seen this distinction made in any of the grammar books I've looked at. A small corpus would be helpful. Father: You must do what your mother tells you. (The father forcefully tells his son what he believes, using "have to" would sound strange here. You could use "have to" if there's le...