Search found 8 matches

by CS
Tue Apr 06, 2004 10:04 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Where's the mistake?
Replies: 20
Views: 2852

Dear larry, I had made no comment at all about CS until he decided to take imaginary offence and write a post that consists of nothing more tnan personal slurs. It no doubt would be more "Christian" to turn the other cheek, but I am not feeling in a charitable mood. Your attitude is very aggressive...
by CS
Mon Apr 05, 2004 4:27 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Where's the mistake?
Replies: 20
Views: 2852

What is it exactly that you're trying to express with all those imperatives? :lol: Well, this is certainly a friendly place, isn't it, now? From what I can tell so far--based on your us(ag)e of the language--it seems to me like you've set youself up as some kind of an authority on what you deem Engl...
by CS
Mon Apr 05, 2004 4:02 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Where's the mistake?
Replies: 20
Views: 2852

Re: Where's the mistake?

Hello everyone, could someone please help me with this sentence? What's wrong with it? Although she was very tired, she could finish the race. Thanks a bunch! The subordinate clause 'Although she was very tired' expresses a general fact, whereas the independent clause 'she could finish the race' ex...
by CS
Mon Apr 05, 2004 3:48 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Help Check something
Replies: 6
Views: 1239

Re: Help Check something

Hi all, I moved the thread with Andrew's Venn Diagram of the English Catenatives here, because he's having some trouble getting the links on his webpage to work, and I've been trying to help him. (And I bet the rest of you are ignoring the thread, and I don't blame you :D). Anyway, if you could go ...
by CS
Sat Apr 03, 2004 2:21 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Lexical Process vs Inflectional Process
Replies: 3
Views: 860

Re: Lexical Process vs Inflectional Process

What Is Inflection? (Click Here) 1. Inflection does not result in a change of word class (e.g. eat (vb.) => eat s (vb.)), whereas Derivation can (e.g. advise (vb.) => advis or (n.) with addition of the derivational suffix -or). 2. Inflection often specifies when an event or situation took place, wh...
by CS
Wed Mar 31, 2004 12:18 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: English aspects
Replies: 12
Views: 2127

Re: English aspects

Hello again people I know that you may be sick and tired of talking about the English aspects, but I really wanted something simple to understand and to have as my background when teaching. May I say that English has three aspects, namely: simple, progressive (or continuos) and perfect ? José [/i] ...
by CS
Wed Mar 31, 2004 10:25 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: commas anyone?
Replies: 2
Views: 812

Re: commas anyone?

[quote='Azar"]The sight of a butterfly floating from flower to flower on a warm sunny day brightens anyone's heart.[/quote] Try, It's not the butterfly per se that brightens one's heart; it's the butterfly's floating from flower to flower on a warn sunny day that brighten's one's heart. Compare, It'...
by CS
Sun Nov 30, 2003 11:58 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Comparatives
Replies: 40
Views: 10061

Re: Comparatives

1.1 But, I've seen lots of natives (mainly) deviate this "rule" by using the word more before the adjective (more green, more close, more wise...) I've seen natives utter such sentences and in songs, is this a common phenomena? May I say that English is simplifying step-by-step the construction of ...