Search found 1195 matches

by LarryLatham
Sat Aug 20, 2005 12:06 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Lessening prices?
Replies: 28
Views: 3537

Re: Lessening prices?

Improved quality and lessening prices have seen digital cameras grow in popularity and this year sales will outstrip the 35mm by 15 to 1. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4130620.stm Can you lessen a price? Shouldn't that be "lower", "lowering" or "falling" or am I being pedantic? Do you find th...
by LarryLatham
Fri Aug 19, 2005 11:55 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Galore
Replies: 20
Views: 2239

:shock: :shock: :shock: I guess I must be leading a sheltered life! What the heck is a "coffee cosy" or a "tea cosy (cozy)"?

It sounds like a nice warm place to sit down with a hot cuppa joe. :)

Larry Latham
by LarryLatham
Sat Aug 13, 2005 10:02 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Article "the" before director + name?
Replies: 6
Views: 886

Nothing wrong with "President Jane Smith" or "President George Bush". When a title and a name appear in immediate sequence, there are two ways in which they can be related: 1. The title and the name are intended to comprise a single identity, so that, for example, "President George Bush" is meant to...
by LarryLatham
Sat Aug 13, 2005 1:15 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Redundant "some"
Replies: 9
Views: 1831

How nice to be able to agree with Stephen Jones.

But actually, I don't find the expression strange at all. Is 40 or 45 a less precise number than 43? Not to my mind. :)

Larry Latham
by LarryLatham
Fri Aug 12, 2005 3:36 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: like friends or as friends?
Replies: 3
Views: 588

I agree with both Lorikeet and the poster on the other forum that both constructions are possible and correct. If I read the first poster correctly, what I think he (or she) means is that when this speaker says, "... as friends ", the implication seems to be that the inn actually makes real friends ...
by LarryLatham
Tue Aug 09, 2005 4:32 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Redundant? "Schmundant!"
Replies: 12
Views: 2029

The grammar mavens always seem to be just loose jointed enough to be able to get their feet in their mouths.

Larry Latham
by LarryLatham
Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:53 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Redundant "some"
Replies: 9
Views: 1831

Not necessarily. " Some " is an indication of part of a whole. In this case, it appears that BBC is suggesting that 43 may not be all of those actually injured. Perhaps their knowledge of the source of information leads them to want to leave the door open for an increase or a decrease in that number...
by LarryLatham
Wed Aug 03, 2005 9:40 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: How long
Replies: 8
Views: 1041

Let me put it another way: (1) I've lived/been studying here for 5 years = I came 5 year ago and am still here now. (2) I'm going to live/will study here for 5 years = I plan to be here until 2010 (3) I study/am studying here for 5 years = It's a 5-year course which I may or may not be part the way...
by LarryLatham
Wed Aug 03, 2005 7:35 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: How long
Replies: 8
Views: 1041

Normally I would take How long is she living here to mean "How long, in total, does she plan to live here?". But...if the sentence comes from an intermediate student of English, then, I'm sure you'll agree, it might be quite a leap from " How long is she living there? " to your recasting. In other ...
by LarryLatham
Wed Aug 03, 2005 3:40 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Redundant? "Schmundant!"
Replies: 12
Views: 2029

Yes, I think so. "Amplifications of the obvious" may be obvious only to insiders, and if an author is writing for a more general audience, he may reasonably feel it necessary to lay out some background.

Larry Latham
by LarryLatham
Wed Aug 03, 2005 3:00 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: subject verb agreement
Replies: 7
Views: 1128

Don't forget, though, that this "rule" I mentioned before I hastened to limit as a " rule of thumb ". JTT is simply pointing out that (as is rather often the case with so called "rules" of English grammar) such rules are not always clearly applied in all cases. This is not to suggest that English is...
by LarryLatham
Wed Aug 03, 2005 3:00 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: subject verb agreement
Replies: 7
Views: 1128

So the above mentioned sentence would also be correct as the following, right?
"One or more pistils are in the very center of the flower."
Right.

Larry Latham
by LarryLatham
Sun Jul 31, 2005 6:24 pm
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Generic "will".
Replies: 112
Views: 10235

Wow! There's been a lot of posting here overnight. Most of it is over my head, I'm afraid, but I'm still pretty clear on certain aspects of this conversation...at least in my own head. I like the Stubbs definition of modality. It squares well with my own. ...those linguistic means by which a speaker...
by LarryLatham
Sun Jul 31, 2005 6:56 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Generic "will".
Replies: 112
Views: 10235

Just like us humans, Brother.
Along with our brother gibbons and other anthropoid arboreal apes. :)

Larry Latham
by LarryLatham
Sun Jul 31, 2005 6:47 am
Forum: Applied Linguistics
Topic: Generic "will".
Replies: 112
Views: 10235

Could we safely say that even though modals do not express facts, the sentences in which they are found can express facts? The modal in a factual sentence plays the role of marking for the (speaker's) stance upon the factuality mentioned in the sentence. Is that a fair statement? I think not, altho...